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Alcoholics Anonymous For Alcohol Addicts

The Founding Of Alcoholics Anonymous


Many people that were alcoholics were able to get over the condition through the help of the groups such as Alcoholics Anonymous. The group was founded by Bill Wilson and Dr. Bob Smith who are both recovering alcoholics in 1935, it began as a community-based fellowship in order to encourage sobriety in many recovering alcoholics. The two founders compiled the twelve steps to direct AA meetings; later they introduced the 12 traditions to help better define the aims of the group. The original steps developed by the pair are still intact while many former alcoholics have credited the group for the help they received during their recovery.


Today, Alcoholics Anonymous has more than 2,000,000 active members all over the world and more than 50 thousand of support groups countrywide.


What Happens At An Aa Meeting

Arriving at the decision to go to an AA meeting can be scary and very uncomfortable, especially for people who don't realise what to expect from it. It requires the individual to venture out of his or her comfort zone and admit before a room full of strangers that they have a problem and need some assistance to get better. It however gets easy becomes all the members share a common experience like yours. It must be understood that the organisation was founded by recovering alcoholics, and the model has served the community well even to this day. Sharing a common experience of being alcoholics is what makes AA successful in its objective and mission.


All attendees of the group will be welcomed with open arms during an AA meeting. New attendees are encouraged to join the discussion, but it is not required. This is because it takes time for one to build trust so they can open up to strangers. After the members has started sharing their experience with others, they'll start seeing some positive changes in their lives.


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What Are Closed And Open Meetings

Only the people that are struggling with alcohol addiction are the ones allowed to attend the closed meetings in AA.

Open meetings, on the other hand, admit family and friends of the alcoholic members. Depending on your comfort level, you can choose to either attend the open or closed meetings. For some people, it is preferable to separate their normal lives from their recovery. However, some people recover faster when their families and friends are near them.


12 Stages Of Recovery

The 12 steps which originated from Alcoholics Anonymous are presently the standards which are applied by all addiction recovery groups. These steps are written one after another, but group members realise that in fact they go in a circle. Steps may be revisited several times until the member comes to grips with that stage of their recovery process.

Admitting that you have a problem and accepting that you need assistance is the first step. Following steps are consciously deciding you want to stop the habit; accepting your wrongs and those others did to you; correcting your mistakes; committing to keep on the road to recovery. More on the 12 steps can be found here


Why Some People Do Not Go To Aa

Since attending AA meetings may bring discomfort, so many people will find reasons not to attend such meetings. Some of the common oppositions which people have in mind are:

  • They do not believe these meetings will be helpful
  • They are afraid to see someone they know at the meeting
  • They do not accept they have a problem

Rather than concentrate on the excuses despite having a feeling that they are enormous people who are nervous about attending a meeting should focus on the reasons why they are considering this organisation in the first place.

Accepting your condition and seeking help is the main objective. Attending a meeting can possibly save you from years of heartache caused by your alcoholism it can in no way be harmful.


Aa Groups Near You

There is always an AA group not too far from where you are. The meetings held many times so you can catch the next one soon. Our meeting finder can help you to locate a group near you depending on whether you're looking for an open or closed meeting. Contact us on 0800 246 1509 today and we'll help you find an AA group that will suit you best.