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Talk To Frank

What Is Talk To Frank?

The campaign against drugs that has the longest duration in the entire UK is Talk to Frank. Yet, has it halted anybody taking drugs?

A police Swat team in the UK burst into a kitchen of a quiet suburban home, and the results were a complete turnaround of the way drug education was done for good. Out went horrid notices of how medications could "mess you up" and sincere appeals to oppose the vile pushers prowling in each play area. In came the quirky funny side and a light-hearted attitude.


The first advert featured a boy calling the police snatch squad on his mother because she wanted to discuss drugs with him. The message delivered by the advert had not been heard before either: "Drugs are illegal. Talking about them isn't. So, Talk to Frank."


Frank: Friendly Confidential Drug Advice

Frank, the new identity for the National Drugs Helpline, was coined by the advertising agency Mother. It was supposed to be the symbol of a reliable older brother that younger individuals can go to for guidance regarding illegal substances. Entirety from the ventures of Pablo, the canine medications mule, to a visit cycle a mind, distribution centre has been exhibited under the Frank name, making it a natural brand name among the country's youth.


According to the creative director, Justin Tindall, of the advertising agency, Leo Burnett, it was important that Frank was at no time seen in the flesh so that he could never be the victim of ridicule for wearing the incorrect shoes or attempting to be "down with the kids". Even the YouTube videos that spoof Frank are respectful. One more thing that distinguishes Frank from other government-funded campaigns is that nothing links the ad to the government in anyway whatsoever.

Education about drug has come a long way since Nancy Reagan and the UK cast of Grange Hill told kids to "Just Say No," which a lot of people not believe was completely counterproductive.


Majority of the ads in Europe now follow the footsteps of Frank in trying to be sincere and allowing the teenagers the right to choose. In some places where there are still tough penalties for possession, ads showing prison bars or disappointed parents are still the norm. For example, in Singapore, a recent campaign recently told young people, "You play, you pay."

Above the Influence, which is an ad that has lasted for a very long time to encourage young people to seek for alternatives to drugs, and which has gulped the UK government some huge amount of money combine caution and humour. The focus of the campaign is to talk to the youth in a language they understand, like the one ad showing a group of "stoners" stranded on a coach. Though, an unexpected number of anti-drug campaigns all over the globe still resort back to strategies intended to arouse fear or alarm, specifically the substance-fuelled plunge to hell. One example is one of the DrugsNot4Me series in Canada that revealed how a very pretty confident woman slipped into deep-eyed wreck because of drugs.

A study carried out in the UK on anti-drugs campaign that ran between 1999 and 2004 shows that adverts that portray the negative results of drug use influence vulnerable youth to try out with the drugs.


By demonstrating how the drugs affect the use, giving the highs and lows, Frank was not supported by the Conservative politicians on the new path it had taken.


Cocaine makes you feel on top of the world was one of its preliminary ads online.

Balancing the message is not always easy to get right. According to the then creative director of digital agency Profero, Matt Powell, who designed the ad, he was wrong in believing that a normal web user has an adequate attention span. Some might not have adhered around to the finish of the liveliness to get some answers concerning the negative impacts. Establishing the integrity of the Frank brand by telling the youth the truth about drugs and their effects was the ultimate aim of the ad, Powell states.

One survey said that 67 percent of young people would call Frank if they needed advice about drugs. The Frank helpline received 225,892 calls and the website received 3,341,777 visits between 2011 and 2012. It is evidence that the method is effective.

However, just like every other anti-drugs campaign in the world , there's no evidence that Frank has actually stopped people from taking drugs.

During the decade that the Frank campaign was introduced, drug abuse figures in the UK have reduced by 9%; however, much of the decline has been attributed to a reduction in the use of cannabis as the more youth shun smoking tobacco.


What Is Frank?

FRANK is a nationwide drug education programme designed and run by the British government's Department of Health in collaboration with the Home Office in 2003. It's supposed to reduce the use of illegal and legal substances by teaching teens about the possible effects of alcohol and drugs. Several media campaigns on the web and on radio have been put out by this programme.


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Services

FRANK gives the accompanying services to individuals who look for data and/or advice regarding drugs:

  • A website
  • A confidential telephone number, available 24 hours a day
  • Email
  • An anonymous live chat every afternoon 2-6pm
  • Help in finding a rehab and treatment facility