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Getting Some Assistance - Treatment

Defining Drug Addiction

Drug addiction is a disease that causes long term changes in the brain that's characterized by an uncontrollable urge to seek out and use drugs despite knowledge of all the harmful consequences. Some of those who use drugs develop some dangerous behaviours due to these alterations in the functioning of their brain. Addiction to drugs is a disease that can throw people into relapse too. Relapse is returning to a habit of drug use after a serious attempt to stop using.


Drug dependency grows from a deliberate choice to take a substance. However, the mental strength to decide whether to use drugs or not is eroded with time. Seeking out and using drugs becomes an obsession. This is mainly because of the effects of long-term substance exposure on the functioning of the brain. Dependence influences parts of the mind required in reward and inspiration, learning and memory plus control over conduct.

Drug dependency is an illness that alters both brain functions and actions.


Is Drug Addiction Treatable?

Yes, yet it's not simple. It is not possible for people to overcome drug addiction simply by abstaining from drug use for some days, because drug addiction is chronic. Many of those under treatment need it over a long time or for the rest of their lives.


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Enslavement treatment must help the individual to the accompanying:

  • Stop taking drugs
  • Remaining drug-free
  • Be a productive member of society, in the family, and at work

Values Of Successful Rehabilitation

These values have been observed since some scientific research was done in the mid-70s as the foundation for a successful recovery plan:

  • Dependency is an intricate, but treatable illness which affects the functioning of the brain and behaviour.
  • No exclusive treatment is correct for everybody.
  • Treatment should be made available to people whenever they need it.
  • To be successful, the treatment plan should not focus on the addiction only but the whole person.
  • It is crucial to remain in treatment for a long enough amount of time.
  • The most frequently used forms of treatment are counselling and other behavioural therapies.
  • Behavioural therapies are often combined with medications, which are another important aspect of therapy.
  • To make sure the user's most current requirements are met, there is a need for continuous evaluations and adjustments to the treatment regime.
  • Mental illnesses associated with drug dependency need to be treated too.
  • Therapeutically helped detoxification is just the primary phase of treatment.
  • Patients do not necessarily enrol for treatment by choice.
  • During treatments, the use of drugs by the patient must be properly observed.
  • Treatment projects ought to test patients for HIV/AIDS, hepatitis B and C, tuberculosis and different chronic infections in addition show them about strides they can go for broke of these illnesses.

How Is Substance Dependency Treated?

Different steps are involved in effective treatments:

  • detox (the process when the body cleanses itself of a substance)
  • Psychological therapist
  • treatment (for opioid, tobacco, or alcohol addiction)
  • Making sure that coexisting mental health issues like depression or anxiety are evaluated and treated
  • long haul follow-up to forestall backslide

Using a wide range of treatments tailored to the needs of the patient is a key to success.


During the rehabilitation, both physical and psychological issues are treated. Follow-up care may comprise group or family-based recuperation supportive networks.


How Is Drug Addiction Treated With Medication?

Administered under professional supervision, prescription medicines are used to help the patient ease into a life without the effects of the drug, stop cravings and manage associated ailments.

  • Withdrawal During the detoxification process, medication helps suppress the physical reactions. Detoxing from the drug is not the only necessary treatment, merely the first step in the process. Patients normally go back to the use of drugs if their treatment is not continued after detoxification. According to one study of treatment centres, medications were utilised in close to 80 per cent of detoxifications (SAMHSA, 2014).
  • Relapse Prevention A patient can make use of medication to assist in re-establishing normal brain function and reducing cravings. Various medicines are used for narcotics (pain killers), tobacco (nicotine) and alcohol dependency. Scientists are busy to develop other medications to treat cannabis (marijuana) and stimulant (methamphetamine and cocaine) dependency. A person who uses more than one substance, which is really typical, require treatment for every substance he/she uses.

How Are Behavioural Therapies Used To Treat Drug Addiction?

Behavioural treatments aid patients:

  • change his/her behaviour and attitude related to the substance use
  • Adopt healthier psychosocial competency
  • continue receiving medication and other types of treatment

A patient can get treatment in several different environments using different approaches.

Outpatient treatment is an option where a wide range of programs are available for patients who continue to visit behavioural health professionals regularly. Individual and group therapy, or a combination of both are involved in most treatment programs.


These projects normally offer types of behavioural treatment, for example,

  • Cognitive behavioural therapy used to help the patient identify trigger circumstances where they are most vulnerable to taking the drugs and how to avoid them and move on to overcome the addiction
  • multidimensional family therapy - designed for teenagers suffering drug addiction and their relatives - which considers several factors that contribute to their drug addiction, with the intention of affecting the functioning of the family in a positive manner
  • Motivational interviewing has been used to prepare a patient to accept their problem and wants to change their actions by seeking help
  • Motivational incentives, which uses positive reinforcement to encourage continued abstinence

Treatment is at times strenuous initially, where a patient attends many outpatient sessions weekly. After the completion of the in-depth treatment, a patient moves to frequent outpatient treatment, which does not meet as regularly and for fewer hours every week to assist with maintaining his/her recovery.


For a patient with severe problems, including coexisting conditions, inpatient or residential treatment is very effective. The around the clock care available at residential rehabilitation centres includes safe boarding facilities and close monitoring of patients. Private treatment offices may utilize an assortment of remedial methodologies and they are for the most part gone for helping the patient carry on a drug free and crime free way of life after treatment.


Benefits of taking an inpatient treatment programme:

  • Therapeutic communities which are exceedingly organised programs in which patients stay at a home, normally for 6 to 12 months. The whole community, everyone from the staff to the patients in recovery, act as agents of change, helping to change every patient's attitude, understanding, and behaviour toward drug use.
  • Shorter-term residential treatment, where detoxification is done and the patient prepared for community based treatment through preliminary intensive counselling.
  • Recovery housing that offers supervised, short-term accommodation for a patient, frequently after other kinds of inpatient/residential treatment. The recovery housing programme provides a bridge for the patients between the long term inpatient facility and re-joining the society; patients are helped to prepare for life on the outside by enabling them to look for jobs and learn how to take care and budget their money.

Coping With Joining The Community

Habitual intake of drugs alters the normal functions of the brain, and various things can cause one to have a burning desire to take the drugs. It's basic for those in treatment, particularly those treated at an inpatient centre or jail, to figure out how to identify, ignore and adapt to triggers they are probably going to be presented to after treatment.